malaysia

Amid vigilante threats, Ahmadis offer olive branch to PPIM

The Ahmadis, who are derogatorily called Qadianis here, adhere to the same beliefs as the Sunni branch of Islam, but also believe that their founder Mirza Ghulam Ahmad was the Imam Mahdi, Islam’s prophesied redeemer. ― Bernama picThe Ahmadis, who are derogatorily called Qadianis here, adhere to the same beliefs as the Sunni branch of Islam, but also believe that their founder Mirza Ghulam Ahmad was the Imam Mahdi, Islam’s prophesied redeemer. ― Bernama picKUALA LUMPUR, Oct 6 — Followers of the Ahmadiyyah community in Selangor have invited the Malaysian Muslim Consumers’ Association (PPIM) to an open dialogue, after a threat was made against them during the latter’s press conference last month.

In a letter written by Ainul Yakin M. Zin, a spokesman for the Malaysian Ahmadiyyah community to PPIM, the group proposed that both sides invite 250 people for the event which should also be recorded.

“We would be grateful for the offer as it is in line with Allah’s command in the Quran for us to conduct a dialogue as a means to sort out any issues,” read a copy of the letter shown by a member of the community to Malay Mail Online.

When contacted, PPIM chief activist Datuk Nadzim Johan said his group will accept the offer for an open dialogue on “religious issues” but the topics of discussion must be ironed out beforehand and that religious authorities should also be present.

“I think we accept… Our only issue is that there must be a limit to the promotion of their religion, because in Malaysia you cannot propagate any other religion besides Islam,” he told Malay Mail Online.

Despite Nadzim’s claim, Ahmadiyyah is not a separate religion, but an Islamic movement.

The Ahmadis, who are derogatorily called Qadianis here, adhere to the same beliefs as the Sunni branch of Islam, but also believe that their founder Mirza Ghulam Ahmad was the Imam Mahdi, Islam’s prophesied redeemer.

At a PPIM press conference on September 27, Masridzi Sat, a spokesman for a group calling itself Gerakan Banteras Aktiviti Haram asked state religious authorities to take action against Baitusalam, a three-storey building in Kampung Nakhoda, Batu Caves — a nexus for Ahmadiyyah followers here.

Masridzi reportedly hinted that inaction by the authorities may lead to his group taking the law into their own hands.

On June 22, 1998, the Selangor Fatwa Committee ruled that followers of Ahmadiyyah teachings are considered “kafir” or non-believers, and that any individual who follows it is an apostate, according to the national e-fatwa database.

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